Strength Training for Rehab2days

Strength training and rehabilitation . . . this is a natural fit, but all too often, physical therapy and physiotherapy programs neglect to adequately address this essential form of exercise. This course dives into strength training theory, the essentials of program design, and how it can be used in the rehabilitation setting.

Course Overview & Objectives

Strength training and therapeutic exercise–in some form or another–is involved in nearly every patient’s and athlete’s rehabilitation program.Unfortunately, the majority of physical therapy/physiotherapy education programs do not offer specific courses on this essential topic. Instead, protocols are often given and serve as a surrogate for this information. We don’t think that teaches the independent, research-based thought process that best serves our athletes and patients.

The general purpose of the course is to advance therapeutic exercise, strength training, and conditioning knowledge of the rehabilitation professional and will fill a strength training knowledge gap for physical therapists. Most practitioners were never introduced to fundamental strength training and conditioning principles and many have a resulting fear in using them (likely directly related to lack of knowledge). As an example, a patient seen by another physical therapist presented to me recently and when discussing “how” to jump and land, he replied, “I was never taught how to do that.” His lack of being taught has the great potential to cause him future injury and is a direct reflection of the lack of preparation by his former physical therapist.

This course provides an overview of strength training and conditioning concepts and will provide the “whys” and related information so practitioners and students can independently develop their own program or protocol. No single current resource provides information to allow the achievement of this goal.

Strength and Conditioning Principles

In-depth guide to exercise, strength training, and conditioning principles in the rehab setting

Physiology

The biology and energy systems of strength training

Specificity

Sport- and injury-specific strength training and conditioning principles

Biomechanics

Impulse, rate of force development, acceleration . . . the basis of strength training and the basis of what we do

Plyometric Principles

How to teach and implement plyometrics into a rehab program

Periodization

Guidelines for the periodization–or planned variation–of rehab programs
Day One

08:00-08:45

Strength Training Anatomy

08:45-10:00

Physiology

10:00-10:15

Break

10:15-11:15

Kinematics

11:15-12:00

Kinetics

12:00-13:00

Lunch

13:00-13:45

Motor Control & Learning

13:45-14:30

Acute Adaptations to Strength Training and Conditioning

14:30-14:45

Break

14:45-15:30

Warm-Up

15:30-16:30

Lab
Day Two

08:00-08:45

Acute Adaptations to Strength Training and Conditioning

08:45-10:00

Strength Training Program Design I

10:00-10:15

Break

10:15-11:15

Strength Training Program Design II

11:15-12:00

Lab

12:00-13:00

Lunch

13:00-13:45

Plyometric Program Design

13:45-14:30

Lab

14:30-14:45

Break

14:45-15:30

Sport-Specific Strength Training

15:30-16:30

Injury-Specific Strength Training

what former students have to say

I have been blessed to work with thousands of students/course attendees over the years and each of them has helped me at least as much as I’ve been able to teach them. I am grateful to have the opportunity to work with so many great people!

David has an insightful way of looking at injuries and the best way to prevent them. He doesn’t just present standard exercise or rehab protocols, he gives us real world information that we can use now. Jessica

DPT, CSCS, Arrowhead Physical Therapy

I met David when he came to lecture in China at Beijing Sport University. He had good information to share and it was well received by me and my classmates. I have incorporated this information in the research I now do. Thank you David. Feng

Researcher, China Institute of Sport Science

When I was pursuing my doctoral degree, David was one of our faculty members. He provided research to support what he taught, which I greatly appreciated. Not only that, he made us think by asking us many questions in reply to our questions. When he was done teaching the course, he remained a mentor and continues to help with professional issues to this day! Morgan

PhD, CSCS, Springfield

It was great having David teach our Biomechanics course. He supplemented the textbook information with situations and experiences he has had. So many times we have teachers that haven’t worked with athletes (which is what I want to do), it helps a ton to be able to have him share those athlete stories with us. It makes it more real. Sam

MS, ATC, CSCS, Briarwood Soccer Club

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